World civilization from Greek antiquity to Renaissance; explores fundamental questions in the human experience, examines formative events in history, and seeks to teach value of important texts.
Prerequisite: 
Although there are no official prerequisites for this course, students should be able to read and write in English at a college level. It is the student’s responsibility to make up for any deficiencies in language, reading, writing, listening, grammar, or note-taking skills. For help with developing study skills, I recommend Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, by Peter C. Brown.
Course Outline: 
Lesson 1: The Paleolithic World
Lesson 2: The Agricultural Revolution
Lesson 3: Jared Diamond, Part 1
Lesson 4: Complex Societies and Cities
Lesson 5: Social Distinctions
Lesson 6: Ancient Religions
Lesson 7: Jared Diamond, Part 2
Lesson 8: Disease and the Environment
Lesson 9: Classical India
Lesson 10: Classical China
Lesson 11: Classical Greece
Lesson 12: Herodotus, The Histories, Part 1
Lesson 13: The Roman Republic and Empire
Lesson 14: The Americas
Lesson 15: Herodotus, The Histories, Part 2
Lesson 17: Midcourse Essay
Lesson 18: World Religions
Lesson 19: The Transformation of the Roman World
Lesson 20: The Islamic World
Lesson 21: States and Empires in Africa
Lesson 22: Herodotus, The Histories, Part 3
Lesson 23: Post-Classical China
Lesson 24: The Indian Ocean World
Lesson 25: Christian-Germanic Europe
Lesson 26: The Crusades
Lesson 27: The Mongols
Lesson 28: John Mandeville, The Book of Marvels and Travels
Lesson 29: The European Economy in a Global Context
Lesson 30: The Black Death
Lesson 31: European and Chinese Exploration
Lesson 32: Primary Source Paper
Lesson 33: Final Exam Essay